Innisbrook Golf

14 09 2011

Although breakfast at Innisbrook was commendable yesterday, I’d spied a place called Flapjacks out on US19.  We were welcomed heartily at the door, then sat down to very good traditional eggs/bacon/pancakes fare.  The pancakes were especially good, with tasty flavor, a hint of butermilk, the right sweet/salt balance, cakey texture, and decent syrup.  OK, not quite as good as certain cakes from Indiana, or Montana even, but worthy.

The morning sun beside Flapjacks Restaurant

Good eats at Flapjacks

We played the Island course at Innisbrook today.  From talking with staff pros and other golfers, we gathered that this course is as, or more, challenging than the Copperhead course also located here at Innisbrook. The professional Traditions tourney is held on Copperhead because the Island course does not have sufficient room for galleries.  As further support of its pedigree, the Island course was recently used for a pro qualifying event.    And we learned that most of the resident pros and scratch golfers respect it more.

Approaching the 3rd tee on the Island Course

We found it a beautiful and difficult course.  A nice guy named Rob golfed with us.  I played a little bit here and there, avoiding the driving tee shots, but generally playing the par-3s and dropping a ball next to Linda’s drive on the par-4s and par-5s.

Resident on the Island Course

We split a great mushroom burger for lunch at the Osprey Club.  I finished it off with 2 Oktoberfests and a couple of ibuprofen, and off we went for further punishment on the Island course.  I decided to play a post-able round, and we both shot well up in the 90s.  Linda got quite tired in the heat, and I struggled to finish out the round with my shoulder howling, bunting the ball down the fairway on many holes.  [For the medically interested reader, it is a rotator cuff muscle inflammation, caused by too much golf too soon. ]

Sizing up an approach shot

Being pitifully convenient, we strolled back to the Osprey Club for dinner, taking seats at the bar, and sharing a big plate of shrimp and pasta dressed up in a pomodoro sauce.  The shrimp were especially tasty, which isn’t all that common these days.  I had two glasses of a very good Cabernet, albeit at $12 a glass (I found this out later).  Wowza.

We reflected on some thoughts from last year, that Florida golf in September is especially challenging.  The hot humid air, moist course, and long rough creates a sense of trying to play golf through cotton gauze.  The ball doesn’t fly and it doesn’t roll.  This not only makes the holes play long, but it creates a misplaced perception that you should swing harder, which is almost always a bad idea.  On the bright side, it is a dandy opportunity to drive up your handicap.

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6 responses

16 09 2011
Alice

I’m especially happy about 3 things in this blog:
1. the good pancakes you found at the Flap-Jack Restaurent.
2. your chance to play at that gorgeous Innisbrook Island Course.
3. you can play a little golf now in spite of your rotator cuff muscle inflammation. A good shot of cortisone might get rid of the pain immediately.

18 09 2011
Rich

Thanks Alice. Cortisone shot is in the realm of possibility but I’ll first try to get along without it. Best thing would be to lay off the golf for a few weeks, but instead I will just try to play less and swing easy. Sounds like you understand shoulder problems – have you had this?

17 09 2011
chuck

Ok Rich, I got the pancakes message, but don’t go schmoooozing up in order to try Indiana pancakes. The damage has been done way back in Washington or Idaho.

18 09 2011
Rich

Well, I believe the damage was done in Montana (for reference: here), although I’m still trying to figure out the extent (or the reason). I guess I threw out that “Indiana cakes” bone but overdid it. 🙂

18 09 2011
Janet

Nice try from a former favorite son-in-law!

19 09 2011
Rich

Back to the drawing board.

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